Monday, 29 April 2013

.......No it isn't.....

At least we have a bit of rainfall but are still suffering from cold winds and temperatures dropping to around freezing virtually every night with no let up in sight. The garden is beginning to green up slowly but in four weeks we should be looking at the optimum time for putting out bedding plants in this area; at least the general public will not be tempted into putting them out too early if this weather continues. I have three real gems in flower at the moment:

 Primula maximowiczii
Primula maximowiczii, a Nivales Section primula which I believe comes from China. These young plants, in a cold mini-tunnel, are from seed that was cold sown in spring last year although they will flower in the same year from an early sowing. They like cool moist acid conditions and being strong growers do better with regular division. 

Meconopsis integrifolia
 

 Currently my pride and joy. Meconopsis integrifolia (Farrer's Lampshade Poppy) from China and Tibet. This specimen has survived flooding and generally very damp conditions and even attempted to flower at the end of last year. The buds eventually started to rot and I removed them to prevent further decay. Surprisingly seems to be as tough as old boots, for a plant that comes from well drained mountain sides, in the wet!

Anemonella thalictroides 'Cameo'
  Although probably four years old now and know to be slow to establish, my only plant of Anemonella thalictroides 'Cameo' is in decline.......... it has been better. I have probably not got the conditions quite right, in fact too dry, and am now considering moving it into a pot as a temporary measure or re-planting it to what, hopefully, may be a better spot. A monotypic member of the Ranunculaceae, Anemonella thalictroides is a beautiful woodlander from North America.

Peat-based composts were actually discussed in the RHS magazine this month, there must still be hope!

 

9 comments:

  1. Three fabulous plants Rick, I am particularly fond of the Meconopsis integrifolia. Am I right in thinking you are not a fan of peat free compost.

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    1. Hi Alistair

      Thanks for the comment, I love Meconopsis so I am particularly happy with getting this one into flower. On the question of peat free composts, although I feel that they are expensive and do not perform well, it as much that I am against having an excellent growing medium like peat taken away from us. I have mentioned it a few times in my blog but if you are interested the Peat Policy at Glendoick is definitely worth a read.(Site map>FAQ's>Peat).

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    2. Thanks Rick, I will take a look at what Glendoick has to say. We get it rammed down our throats continually as to how we are endangering the planet its impossible not to have doubts about using peat for our garden.

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    3. Pleased to have picked up that information from you Rick, very interesting indeed. http://www.glendoick.com/index.php?page=faq-peat

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    4. Glad you found it of interest Alistair, it is good to read an informed piece written by someone with no axe to grind.

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  2. The yellow Meconopsis is really a beautiful plant. Love it. I would like to see if it would grow here in my gardens on the shores of Lake Michigan in USA. I like that plant. It would look great in my Asian Garden room.

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    1. Hi, Meconopsis are my favourite genus of plants, I am sure they would do well in your temperate climate, in the most part the only thing they do not like is too hot summers preferring the North of the UK.

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  3. Have just found your blog. Love it! Primula maximowiczii is a new addition to my garden. I haven't found a place to put it yet! I am enjoying the flowers though. Your meconopsis are lovely. I'm giving them a try for the first time this year.

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    1. Hi Angie, Thank you for your kind words. As you will have gathered I have a love of Primulas and Meconopsis and have fairly good local conditions for them, which I suspect will not be quite as good as yours up in Scotland. Good luck with your plants I find both genera very rewarding.

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