Saturday, 21 June 2014

Meconopsis paniculata 'Ghunsa group'

 This is very much my pride and joy this year but as it was grown from seed I can't 100% guarantee that it is the real deal but it certainly seems to tick all the boxes. The golden haired foliage is very striking and although we have had a very wet Winter this plant survived despite its hairiness and susceptibility to rot to produce a wonderfully robust flower spike. 


Young plants.
Planted out in June 2013

This is in October, the silvery sheen is caused by water droplets and the rosette if beginning to flatten out for the Winter.

Mid-May 2014 and the leaves are lifting up and opening out to uncover the flower spike.

A week later and the spike is well on the way.

End of May and the first flowers are showing.

Close up of the head of the spike showing the wonderful hairy leaves.

Taken tonight, being a Meconopsis it flowers from top to bottom, maybe if all the flowers came out at once it would be more attractive but to me it is beautiful and gives a real sense of achievement.



I have grown Meconopsis regia which is very similar but definitely not the same so until someone tells me different I am truly pleased with my Meconopsis paniculata 'Ghunsa group'. Its little brother is also flowering at the moment but is sat in a pot and is not as robust.

10 comments:

  1. Congratulations, it is very attractive. I have never managed to get Meconopsis seeds to sprout (the ones I have tried were probably too old) and our garden would no doubt be too hot for them in summer. I have never seen a Meconopsis paniculata, let alone one of the 'Ghunsa group'. It is a very interesting plants. I suppose it prefers acidic, cool soil.

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    1. Thanks Alain, I grow quite a few Meconopsis here in North West England although the winter damp is a bit too much for them sometimes. You are quite correct the freshness of the seed is the key but I have had several attempts to get this one to germinate hence the excitement! You are again correct as it prefers cool peaty but well drained soil in sun or light shade and cool damp summers are the key.

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    2. Where I come from (in eastern Québec by the gulf of St-Laurence) is a public garden famous for Meconopsis betonicifolia (http://www.refordgardens.com/english) but they have cool summers and peaty soil. In fact most of the peat sold in North America is harvested not far from there.

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    3. Thanks for the address of a very interesting site Alain.

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  2. It looks a lovely plant, Rick. I do not do very well in the east, perhaps it is too dry fro meconopsis. I don't think it likes my very sandy soil.

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    1. I think you are correct Roger, they certainly would struggle on your sandy soil.

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  3. Hi Rick, lovely plant, I haven’t grown meconopsis before, although have looked into some for my shady bottom part of the garden. Isn’t it great to be able to grow plants from seed and see them finally in flower? I know every time I have a batch of Lilium regale or Arisaema in flower for the first time I feel very proud, especially since they take so many years.

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    1. Hi Helene, with only a couple of exceptions every Meconopsis and Primula I have was grown from seed, once you get into the cycle of germination and growing-on time doesn't seem to matter, it is only with your first attempts that it seems more important. I do share your sense of pride and achievement, first that some things germinate at all, and then the flowering is the icing on the cake.

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  4. I can see why you're pleased with it. What a cool plant! The flower buds are nifty, too. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thanks, it sure is a cool plant for cool conditions!

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