Friday, 22 May 2015

May pictorial.

The weather is only just showing signs of improving here as the temperatures slowly climb but this has been accompanied by rain and my already waterlogged garden is still subject to flooding. The warm early spring weather promoted growth the result was that quite a lot of frost damage was sustained. I have planted up a couple of containers with summer bedding but will leave the bulk till the end of the month just to be on the safe side. This year, because of the number of seeds I have cold sown, I haven't bought any plugs but instead have supported the local scouts with their plant sale picking up a few extras from other local sources.

The tunnel looks a bit of a mess, new seedlings growing on with trays of bedding plants.

In the main border, one of my favourite early flowering herbaceous plants Chaerophyllum hirsutum Roseum

Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost' is growing on well but..............

Brunnera macrophylla 'Looking Glass' has only one flower stem.
The first of the big blue poppies in flower, this one is Meconopsis 'Lingholm'

The "woodland" garden.





Galium odoratum  (Sweet woodruff) under the developing leaves of Cardiocrinum giganteum which will not flower this year.

Geranium phaeum 'Samobor' develops very quickly and seeds itself about.

Lamium orvala is very reliable and does not spread the only drawback being that the flowers appear on the stem under the leaves so are not easy to see.



New stuff.
I tried Camassia leichtlinii 'Caerulea' for the first time as the bulbs will stand damp conditions and am quite impressed.

I planted this Paeonia veitchii var. woodwardii, grown from seed, at the back of the border earlier this year as I had it in mind that it was a tall grower like my Paeonia delavyii, unfortunately it isn't having a dwarf habit. The flower was a surprise and I have now had to move it to a better position...........Stupid boy!!!!

Podophyllum hexandrum or the Himalayan Mayapple has quite attractive flowers as well as the striking foliage. This group, from seed, have only just been planted out. sometimes known as "Spotty Dotty" although there is actually a cultivar of this name.

Over-sized rhubarby thing Rheum palmatum tanguticum has beautiful deep red emerging leaves.
Wildlife.

Picture not too good as it was taken through the window, although this Jay is a handsome chap he was very unpopular with the other birds. Never had them before.

12 comments:

  1. Love the big blue poppy and your woodland garden, some very bold foliage plants.

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    1. Thank you, Meconopsis are my number one favourites.

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  2. It's always nice to see a new visitor in the garden isn't it Rick.
    As usual, your woodland is just gorgeous. I am trying Camassia for the first time this year too - great minds, eh :) Although I didn't quite do my homework and the one I bought C. cusackii is possibly not hardy enough here. Love your Mec, it's cracker. I have a single bud on mine (seedling from my white one last year) I can't wait to see what colour it will be. Have a good bank holiday weekend.

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    1. Thanks Angie, Hope your poppy turns out to be a good one and that you also have a good weekend.

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  3. How fantastic to have a Jay in the garden. I always love to see them, but it happens very rarely. Glad you are enjoying your Camassia, they are a real joy !

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    1. Thanks Jane, we actually have a pair of Jays in the garden who must be nesting near by, most of the small birds disappear when they are around as they do raid nests, on the other hand, the magpies are particularly aggressive but it takes one to know one I suppose :-)

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  4. I haven't had Chaerophyllum in the garden, I like the look of the foliage. Good to see your woodland doing well. We also had a Jay in the garden a couple of weeks ago, I wasn't so lucky, it was gone before I got the camera out..

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    1. Things also always seem to happen to me at the most inopportune moment Alistair, I have a camera 'phone but not being of the "selfie" generation I forget it is in my pocket. The Chaerophyllum is a must for late spring, but it is quite robust, mine were grown from seed and it was apparently a great favourite of Graham Stuart Thomas the author of Perennial Garden Plants.

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  5. really refreshing pictures.
    Keep blogging.

    A fellow blogger from India
    http://canyouvish.blogspot.in/

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  6. Oh, Meconopsis 'Lingholm' is a stunner, I have wanted a meconopsis for ages, wonder if I can find a space for it in my new garden? Not sure if it will be happy in my London garden, to be honest I would probably be more confident growing it back in Norway! How much shade does it tolerate? My new garden turns out to have large areas of a mix of complete shade and only a few hours sun, I think I will have to add some more shade tolerant plants to my collection. Your woodland area looks great, camassia is new to me, one to look out for I think :-)

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  7. You are quite right Helene they would be much happier in Norway, a cool moist but well drained spot in light shade is ideal, but they do like their damp cool summers and if they feel like it succumb to damp cool winters!......... fickle :-)

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