Friday, 26 June 2015

June musings.


We have suffered from some really mixed weather recently, I have done some bedding containers and baskets for the first time since the bad summers we had when I swore not to do them again, so I am a little bit nervous about the type of summer we are going to have. The good news is that the weather is forecast to be fantastic next week, but for how long?


 Viburnum plicatum 'Mariesii' is already fading to pink but the contrast between it and the Berberis thunbergii 'Atropurpurea' is always welcome. The candelabra primulas are still going strong and in the foreground you can just see the tips of some of the containerised lilies emerging amongst the flowers of  'Gertrude Jekyll'


 Although the azaleas have finished flowering, there is still some colour from the candelabras and a few scattered aquilegia. The next flush of colour will come from lilies, Astilbes and Eupatorium.The Cardiocrinum giganteum is well over 6' tall and just about to break bud.


 The seed-heads of Meconopsis 'Lingholm' are at the forefront of this tangle containing alliums, clematis, campanulas, lilies, aquilegia, monkshood, Crocosmia, Hesperis matronalis, Chaerophyllum hirsutum roseum and the bells of Nectaroscordum siculum. The big leaves at the back belong to Telekia speciosa.


 The rose on the arch is Albertine there are also four different clematis in there somewhere. I can no longer remember the name of the bamboo to the left but nestling in font of it is Euonymus japonicus Aureopictus 'Luna' which I have a struggle to stop reverting, probably because of its shady position.

 This view encompasses my "primula bed" although the most dominant specimen in it is the yellow form of Meconopsis napaulensis complemented by the Sambucus Nigra 'Black Lace' surrounded by primulas, ferns, hostas, foxgloves et al. 


I just love the metallic grey/green hostas they also seem to suffer less slug damage.


A jumble of hostas, geraniums, aquilegia, astilbes, ferns and Welsh Mountain Poppies with the odd Angelica archengelica and clump of Anemone tomentosa 'Robustissima' thrown in.



 Looking back from the "woodland" bit, the fern-like green leaves (almost center) are those of Paeonia delavayi.



 A view featuring another of my favourite plants which is just about to be covered in pink flowers, Spirea japonica 'Golden Princess'.


 The splashes of white in some of the pictures are caused by another one of my favourites, Hesperis matronalis or Sweet Rocket, here it seen lighting up the deep shade of Cedrus atlantica 'glauca'. A brassica, it is actually a short lived perennial but is best grown as a biennial. Not only is it easy to grow from seed and will thrive in shade but it has a delightful light scent.


 Here we have  Astrantia 'Claret' being "stalked" by its neighbour on the right ........................


Ten days later and Boom! Geranium 'Eureka Blue' has gone off like a rocket!


Evergreen geranium, G. macrorrhizum has scented leaves and grows in shade. Helleborus argutifolius syn. H.corsicus is sprouting new growth, I should have removed the old flower heads by now but they are so attractive.


Hydrangea petiolaris syn. Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris dominates the side of the house.


Iris chrysographes 'Black Gold', grown from seed this has proved to be a really reliable plant, the slim, almost black flowers putting on a show every year.


Has anyone any idea as to which deciduous azalea this is please.

Rodgersia pinnata 'Hercules'
One last look at the Meconopsis for this year for all of you with warm dry gardens .............. honestly!

13 comments:

  1. What a fantastic glorious jumble. Just how a garden should look. And of course it is not really wild - it takes great skill on your part to make it look so natural

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    1. Thanks for the kind words Roger much appreciated coming from you. To be honest, although there may be a bit of instinct involved, I pretty much let nature take its course then trim its edges.

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  2. Lush and lovely looking this June Rick. I second what Roger has just said! Last picture makes me really swoon. My I chrysographes has just flowered for the first time. Aren't they gorgeous. I look forward to spreading this plant around my garden.

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    1. Thanks Angie, of course our rainfall helps the green look and aids the primulas and meconopsis. Iris chrysographes sets seed which germinates easily when cold sown and will flower in its second year.

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    2. Thanks for info re the seeds Rick. Saved me the bother of looking it up :)

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  3. All look vey healty Rick.
    Is it a trick of the light or is you Dames Rocket (Hesperis matronalis) whihte? It must be easier to use than the regular colour.
    We are having a very wet summer so far with downpour every second day.

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    1. Thanks Alain, the Hesperis is the white form although I do have a couple which are a sort of light purple/pink colour to varying degrees. Like your name Dame's Rocket, I presume that comes from "matronalis".

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  4. It looks fabulous. How do you keep your hostas so pristine?

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    1. Basically rd I am a dinosaur and still use pellets, I spread them thinly throughout the garden at the first signs of slug and snail activity, usually in March, to catch the first flush of hatchings and then usually twice more during the season on warm humid nights. I have tried using the likes of garlic spray after the first application of pellets as a control but to be frank have never found anything which I can say works.

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  5. Rick, your garden is looking so very welcoming, I really like the Viburnum plicatum 'Mariesii' with its tiered branches, our one in Aberdeen would have looked like this if only we had given it room. Good luck with your baskets and containers, you have me wondering how bad the weather can be to have such an effect when I consider what ours had to cope with up north..

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    1. Thanks Alistair, the viburnum is my number one shrub. The vow to stop doing baskets and containers was brought about because of spending two summers looking through windows with rain running down them at battered plants which were actually rotting off in some cases. I was growing from seed and plugs and just thought it was such a waste of money and effort I decided not to bother again. On a brighter note don't worry too much as those years weren't typical.

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  6. I hope you got the nice weather you wanted? The weather down here has been too hot and not much rain at all for weeks on end, today is the first day really where I feel I can work in the garden, but it’s still warm though with 27 degrees in the shade.

    And I am so jealous about your meconopsis, I won’t even have a go at them here in my new garden – I could possibly have managed to grow one at the bottom of my old garden, but here at my new place, no way. I have to start thinking of ‘sun loving plants’ for the centre garden– a rather new, but exciting concept for me, but many of my plants will fit that bill already, I just forced them to tolerate shade in my old garden :-)

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  7. Well Helene, we seem to be suffering from plenty of rain and thunder and lightning at the moment but rumour has it there is better weather on the way. Although, as you say, you have already many sun loving plants, if you do have a really sunny garden it does open up an entirely new challenge for you. Any doubters will comply with a stern word from you :-)

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